Millennipost

1000th post fingers side

I was about to start this post – my 1,000th! – with something trite like, “Hard to believe, eh?” but I’m retracting that, because I can totally believe it!  I was here for all 1,000 posts, and they didn’t just magically compose themselves out of thin air.  This blog is the product of a lot of hard – but so fun – daily work and I’m tremendously proud of all that I’ve built up over the past two and a half years.

I recently read that the failure rate for blogs is on par with that of opening a restaurant. That means roughly 90 percent of bloggers tap out within the first three months to a year of start-up.  It’s an approximate number born out by my own experience – with the exception of a handful of lovely followers (oh, how I loathe that term; no cult leader am I) that have, to my great delight and wonderment, made this blog one of their second virtual homes, most readers come and go within six months.

So how have I persisted while others have already closed up (or abandoned) shop?

1. It sounds like a real no-brainer, but centre your blog around something you feel passionately about. It doesn’t particularly matter if what you feel passionately about is animal welfare or world politics or poetry or nail art or constructing elaborate miniature dioramas of the Globe Theatre populated entirely by hamsters in velveteen period costumes – if it holds your interest and you’re having fun sharing that interest with others, you’ll blog to do precisely that.

2. Don’t take shit from others.  I’ve learned that the act of blogging – particularly silly old beauty blogging – is a lightning rod for some people to tell you how and why you’re wasting your life and bandwidth.  The me of years’ back probably would have folded pretty quickly under the critical gaze of others, but the me of today refuses to be chased away from something she loves because it doesn’t look like someone else’s definition of a “proper” undertaking.  Don’t allow your blogging efforts to be derailed by a judgmental few.

3. Never stop learning.  Whether it’s keeping abreast of the latest updates to your blogging platform, learning new techniques, teaching yourself relevant computer programs, trying out new products and vendors or whatever the heck aligns with your blog, never stop trying to understand the (virtual) world around you.  Keep things fresh and interesting and it’s something you’ll want to return to every day.

4. Get involved in the community.  Blogging does not occur in a vacuum.  Cultivate online (and maybe even real life) friendships with like-minded bloggers and you’ll come to think of your online space as more than just a place for you to dump your random thoughts.

And to that end,

5. Have something to say.  Or do or display or demonstrate or show off or any one of the other thousands of action-oriented verbs in the English language.  Using your blog as a public diary can be cathartic, sure, and I’m not trying to diminish the importance of getting your thoughts out in the world and off your mind, but in terms of blog sustainability, we all eventually run out of things to say (just not apparently me.)  Tying your blog and your writing to some other product you’ve created gives you a built-in subject, and a jumping off point for other tangential discussions (it’s how I get away with talking about The Lost Boys every 27th post.)

So there, some hopefully wise words of blogging advice from an old timer who’s been there, done that, forgotten how the stupid saying actually goes.  As always, thank you to the enthusiastic supporters (that’s so much better than “follower,” right?) who always have a kind and friendly word, and who make this space such a fun and enjoyable place to call MY second home.  Here’s to the next 1,000!

1000th post fingers front

 

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13 thoughts on “Millennipost

  1. Congratulations, that’s awesome.. I just slightly redid my name but after a year with WordPress.com I’m moving to self hosted, & there is just soooo much more involved in learning as I go, a bit overwhelming right now but I will figure it out eventually, still my blogs gonna be the main part of it!

    • Thank you very much! Oh, self-hosting…I’m not brave enough to go there just yet. I’m hideously un-computer-friendly, and just navigating WP has been an adventure. I bet it feels great, though, to strike out on your own, learning as you go – I always feel so nicely satisfied when I’ve managed to puzzle through something solo.

  2. Happy 1,000th! I can ‘amen’ to all your reasons as to why you’ve kept going, and I’m glad you have.
    (p.s I now wish there was a blog about hamsters in velveteen period costumes as I bet it would be super cute.)

    • Thanks so much! It feels pretty darn good keepin’ on keepin’ on. 🙂

      Hmm, joint hamster project? Important details out of the way first – which one of us is wrangling the hamsters? 😉

  3. Holy crap. 1000th post! Woohooo! *throws confetti*
    I’m amazed that you change your polish DAILY. I sometimes struggle with the WEEKLY routine, lol!
    Haha you do seem to mention The Lost Boys a LOT! 😛
    Great points – I wholeheartedly agree with them! Here’s to another 1000 posts!

    • Thank you! It felt very good. 🙂 Moving on to the next 1,000.

      And I totally talk about The Lost Boys ALL THE TIME. I’ve made so much of that movie’s dialogue shorthand in my own life to express whatever the heck I’m thinking – it’s kind of disturbing!

  4. Sorry I am late to wish you a Happy 1000th post!

    What a thoughtful and eloquent post…its a big part of why I like to visit…also of course the pretty polishes, fun nail art, and your sparkling personality (no particular order)!

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